In Other’s Words: On Community

This is such a true saying, that I decided that it is worth sharing despite being off topic for this blog. Tucked into The American Conservative’s Rod Dreher’s latest piece was this gem that jumped out at me:

“Southerners have an advanced capacity to put up with a lot for the sake of keeping social harmony. It can and does lead to all kinds of dysfunction — oh yes indeed it does! — but it also works magic in keeping messy people together. The bonds of family and community cannot be stretched infinitely, of course, but they can be stretched a lot farther than people think.”

This is true. We southerners, particularly of a certain age, know how to overlook some things for the greater good. It’s not always for the ultimate best, as Dreher points out. However, I would argue that more often than not, it is.

As the south becomes more and more populated with people whose roots are planted elsewhere, this is becoming less true, but it’s still mostly true. For now at least, which I think is a very good thing.

6 thoughts on “In Other’s Words: On Community

  1. Crystal Keller says:

    Yes we need to make an effort to keep the peace. I realized (after I was in my late teens and had learned the full extent to which my mother disliked her mother and brothers) this was the Christmas Miracle I was witnessing every year when we gathered for Christmas Eve at my grandparents house. For that one evening it was peace on earth good will toward men. We laughed and spoke kindly for that one night. What a joy it would have been to express goodwill more than 3-4 hours once or sometimes twice a year. Forced kindness really is good for us and others around us.

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  2. professorGBFMtm2021 says:

    You know my ex-veitnam best bud at physical rehab&I had three main things in common other than being men&that was being raised in the south,on farms& dedicated christians!
    Thats what kept the south together for most of the 20th century&of course once northeners started coming south in huge numbers starting in the 90’s that started falling apart!
    But like you say I&him grew up before all the modern ”you have to be scared of every stranger” stuff started heavily in the mid-late ’80s!Him in the 60’s&I mainly in the ’80’s!
    I wanted to go visit him,but then I had more detours with my life&after that, all the covid stuff got in the way of course!I got along with all the nurses&physical therapists at physical rehab!
    Most of the other patients at phys rehab were almost all 30 years+older than me I did’nt realy get around them, just my best bud who also was a bit of a merrymaker like myself!Hence the fifth thing we had in common! You know whatever happened to PEDAT?I know he did word entrys on the urban dictionary but disappeared sometime around ’16 or so?I liked his knowledge&attitude on dalrock&even on boxers site once too around ’17 I think!!

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  3. karly says:

    “We southerners, particularly of a certain age, know how to overlook some things for the greater good. It’s not always for the ultimate best, as Dreher points out. However, I would argue that more often than not, it is.”

    I agree with you. As I get older, I realize more and more what’s a big deal, enough to make a fuss about, and what isn’t worth the mental energy or familial unrest. Especially as my children are near entering into adulthood, I want to be an example of this to them so that they can learn this lesson sooner than I did. I’m not always good at it, but I believe the Lord will fill in the gaps.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Elspeth says:

    It would be wonderful if families could put aside slights and differences at times other than holidays, Crystal.

    Alas, I’m thankful for what we do have because it there’s one thing 2020 showed us, it’s that a lot of people aren’t even capable of doing that.

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  5. Elspeth says:

    Especially as my children are near entering into adulthood, I want to be an example of this to them so that they can learn this lesson sooner than I did. I’m not always good at it, but I believe the Lord will fill in the gaps.

    Me too, Karly, and I trust that the Lord will fill in the necessary gaps. I can already see evidence that my adult children are better at this than I am.

    Liked by 1 person

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