Word Nerd Wednesday: Bookish Words Edition

This blog was born of the fact that I am a bibliophile. Ever since I was a child, I have loved to read. This site has been low on book reviews of late, however. That isn’t because I’m not reading. It’s because I’m reading about a particular topic to the exclusion of all else in preparation for a class I’ll be teaching in the upcoming school year. I pondered reviewing the books here and decided that posting numerous reviews of scholarly books on the history of Florida is a surefire way to run off the few readers I have left.

As I contemplated the irony of a bibliophile’s book review blog with very few reviews, I began wondering about interesting words that define various aspects of being a booklover. There are actually three that I’d never heard of, so I thought I’d share them here.

Abibliophobia: The fear of running out of things to read.

This word had to have been evolved before the advent of mass printing. I have never feared running out of things to read. On the contrary, if I have a fear at all in this regard, it’s more in the vein of, “I’ll never be able to read all the things I want to read before I die!”

Biblioklept: A person who steals books

This one made me chuckle. Unless it’s a rare or expensive book that can be sold for profit, are there any people in our current culture whose preferred version of kleptomania is books? Very Interesting! Lastly, but certainly not least, we have:

Bibliopole: A person who buys and sells books, especially rare ones.

I like this one. One of the things we have done from time to time is look at online calssified sites for books. On more than one occasion, there are people selling very old books that belong to their parents or grandparents. It’s a fun excursion.

Do you have any bookish words to share? Please do so!

6 thoughts on “Word Nerd Wednesday: Bookish Words Edition

  1. Bike Bubba says:

    It doesn’t have the Greek root “Biblio”, but the word “Antiquariat”–seller of old used books–has appealed to me for decades. Well, really, probably more the experience of going into a good one and finding something beautiful….

    Liked by 2 people

  2. professorGBFMtm2021 says:

    ELSPETH.you most likely were not expecting this slightly lengthy comment from myself,but is any of my comments expected?

    As long as you have read the bible&afew of the main classics is there much else that needs to be read?See how I can be succinct when I want to be?

    Also be like myself&boby mcferrin as we ”don’t worry,be happy” while we whistle!!
    You have been seeing less of me elsewhere maybe this verse is a clue why?:Luke 21:15
    ”For I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which none of your adversaries will be able to withstand or contradict.

    The wisdom that God provides will not be able to be thwarted. He will give you the understanding and the means to express it”.

    You already know before anybody else preaching MOSES&JESUS was banned(By wordpress itself!) that GBFM was there before them,right?Ask ORKAHEAD he knows better than almost anyone the life&times of GBFM!!
    All of my haters&detractors also know not how many times I have been caught between life&death since I was a child,mainly because I have not told them!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Elspeth says:

    As long as you have read the bible&afew of the main classics is there much else that needs to be read?

    Hmm, professor. That’s an interesting question to ponder for a bit. Here’s what I’ll say for now.

    There probably isn’t much else that needs to be read. The Bible and many of the main classics have thoroughly tilled the ground of human natureHowever, there are a few writers saying some things germane to how those things work themselves out in our postmodern culture.

    I hope to have another review up in the next 7-10 days of such a book.

    Thanks for making me think, Prof! 🤗

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Bike Bubba says:

    We probably need to define “a few of the main classics.” I know Mortimer Adler tried to come up with a list, and I believe he came up with a set of 50 books or so. One thing I’ve learned over the years is that a lot of the things I’ve read–from some of those classics to the “yellow magazine”–really speak to the cultural context one needs to understand the Scriptures well. It doesn’t mean that everyone needs to read every book, but I think there is a very real benefit to being well and broadly read in this regard.

    Or, put somewhat differently, I’ve had a lot of experiences with people who thought they “only had to read the Bible”, and let’s just say that as a rule, their exegesis left a little to be desired.

    Like

  5. Elspeth says:

    We probably need to define “a few of the main classics.”

    That’s true, and besides Dante, Homer, and Shakespeare, I wouldn’t know where to begin. There’s Dostoevsky, whose work is transcendant (at least to me), and Jane Austen, who never fails to get to the heart of the matter when it comes to the nature of the female psyche.

    But the list could really be endless, which brings us back to the beginning, doesn’t it?

    I’ve had a lot of experiences with people who thought they “only had to read the Bible”, and let’s just say that as a rule, their exegesis left a little to be desired.

    True indeed, Bike, True indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

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