Dissecting Fault Lines: Chapters 10-11

This is the final post in the series examining Voddie Baucham’s Fault Lines. The first three posts are here, here, and here.

Chapters 10 and 11 round out this book. They focus on how we, as Christians, can and should respond to the error being propagated in our respective churches and relationships. Baucham doesn’t really offer an solutions to the problem of the coming war in the church, because he doesn’t think it can be avoided. What he offers instead is a way to think as we move forward.

Chapter 10: Restoration and Mitigation

Chapter 10 is informative in overlapping ways. It starts by stating what I said above. Namely, that there is a war on Christianity, and that many well meaning believers are being duped into fighting for the wrong side. Their loving nature and desire for justice is inducing them to accept premises that are firstly, not true, and more importantly, at odds with Biblical truth.

This chapter lays out the nature of the battles we face as well as the weapons with which we need to fight. Baucham graciously explains his reasoning for calling out ministries and ministers by name. He is clear that he dearly loves these people, but that he is unambiguously at war with the “ideology which with they have identified with to one degree of another”.

He follows this with a clear explanation of the problems with BLM. Among the issues he takes are that Black Lives Matter is:

  1. An openly pagan, Marxist-Leninist organization
  2. An openly feminist, Pro-LGTBQIA+ organization
  3. Openly anti-male and anti-family

He goes on to explain the importance of Christians confronting the lies and holding to the truth, no matter the cost. One of the things I have always appreciated about Bro. Baucham’s teaching is his refusal to equivocate. He makes it clear where he stands on page 223:

The facts about Black Lives Matter are not in dispute. The organization is Marxist, revolutionary, feminist, misandrist, pro-LGBTQIA+, pro-abortion, and anti-family, with roots in the occult. It is unacceptable for Christians to partner with, celebrate, identify with, or promote this organization. And that includes being bullied or pressured into using the phrase “black lives matter.”

When I say this, people always ask, “Are you saying that black lives don’t matter?” Allow me to respond.

He does respond, quite masterfully, beginning with making it clear that he rejects the premise of the question. Asking the question of a black person is about the most ridiculous thing any person can ask, and I say this from experience. Baucham continues:

I am a Christian. I believe that all men are made in the image of God. Therefore, I most certainly believe that the lives of people matter regardless of how much or how little melanin is in their skin.

In other words, all lives matter! I know that’s been deemed offensive, but it’s true. Recently, Andrew Klavan said something worth remembering. This is roughly paraphrased, but I thought it was insightful in ways that I haven’t yet heard in these discussions, and like most of you, I have heard quite a lot this past year. Klavan (father of the recently featured Spencer Klavan) noted:

There is no such thing as a black life. A person’s life is not black; their skin is. A person’s life is not white; their skin is.

It goes without saying that this applies to all of the people- made in the image of God- of various hues with varied amounts of melanin in their skin. It astonishes me how, in a country filled with citizens from so many ethnic backgrounds, we get stuck speaking of these issues in black and white. The occasional obligatory nod is offered to so-called “people of color”, but this usually happens only when there is political leverage to be gained from it.

Chapter 11: Solid Ground

Chapter 11, the shortest of the chapters, aims to reiterate what Christians believe about repentance, forgiveness, and salvation. It reminds us that Scripture is sufficient to help us navigate these waters and that love for the brethren doesn’t mean abdicating our responsibility to stand for the truth.

If there is one thing Baucham makes clear in this book, it’s that he has chosen his side. He is on the Lord’s side, regardless of what this public stand may cost him. It is admirable,and to be emulated.

The book also includes two appendices. One is the text of The Dallas Statement, which Bro. Baucham co-authored in 2018 with John MacAruthur and other noted ministers in reaction to the swelling tide of critical social justice sweeping into the church. You can find the entire statement here.

The second appendix is the critical theory resolution as passed by the Southern Baptist Convention in 2019.

This is an important book which I am glad to see climbing best seller’s lists. Christians need to be vigilant during this time, and Fault Lines offers us the education and tools needed to so just that.

5 out of 5 stars.

6 thoughts on “Dissecting Fault Lines: Chapters 10-11

  1. maea says:

    If there’s a sticking point I’d like to see Baucham address, it’s the argument that the reason why “Black Lives Matter” is preferable than “All Lives Matter” is because the latter ignores the realities and unique circumstances the black community has to experience. Or, the argument that right now the black community needs to bring attention to certain issues and BLM isn’t saying other lives don’t matter– it’s that black lives do right now.

    Like

  2. Elspeth says:

    If there’s a sticking point I’d like to see Baucham address, it’s the argument that the reason why “Black Lives Matter” is preferable than “All Lives Matter” is because the latter ignores the realities and unique circumstances the black community has to experience. Or, the argument that right now the black community needs to bring attention to certain issues and BLM isn’t saying other lives don’t matter– it’s that black lives do right now.

    The problem with this line of reasoning, which I too have heard on numerous occasions, is that it belies the demonstrable evidence that BLM doesn’t really care one whit about so-called black lives. People get offended when you start offering statistics because they say, “To start throwing around statistics is to diminish the feelings of people who feel violated or discriminated against.”

    But guess what? The truth is worth hurting feelings because these lies are doing far too much damage.

    Statistically, police are 18 times more likely to kill white Americans than black Americans. The disproportionate percentage of police interactions with black citizens is a direct result of the fact that crime rates are higher in black communities. Believe me, it gives me no pleasure to say that, for obvious reasons.

    Given the fact that there actually isn’t an epidemic of police gunning down black men, and that black people are killing one another at an exponentially higher rate than anyone else is killing us, I find the entire BLM movement nothing more than a disingenuous grift. The evidence for my assertion is again, overwhelming.

    Millions and millions of dollars have been raised on the names of Michael Brown (a justified shooting), Breonna Taylor, et al. No one knows where any of that money has gone other than on real estate and houses for BLM founders/leaders.

    So, because this is getting long, that argument is a weak one used to shut down any opposition to what is in reality, a movement and a phrase built on lies and propaganda aided in its spread by the media. It doesn’t matter how emotional we are about a lie, or how often we have talking heads telling a particular lie. Or how many people believe the lie. None of those unfortunate realities suddenly make the lie become the truth.

    Baucham actually spills a lot of ink making these same points, with much more evidence and eloquence. You should give the book a read.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Bike Bubba says:

    One question that comes to mind for me is how, apart from inadvertent disparate impacts, we could have systematic racism in this country. I’m not figuring out much, and to me, that’s the strongest critique I can come up with for CRT.

    I also have the thought that if indeed we are claiming discrimination where it doesn’t exist, people are going to be at each others’ throats needlessly, and the fallout from that, beyond the obvious “this doesn’t lend itself very well to love”, is “this isn’t going to lend itself very well to people working together and advancing economically.”

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Elspeth says:

    One question that comes to mind for me is how, apart from inadvertent disparate impacts, we could have systematic racism in this country. I’m not figuring out much, and to me, that’s the strongest critique I can come up with for CRT.

    The overwhelming thrust of critical theory is built on the idea of casting blame and acquiring power. These people all know that this country is not systemically racist. Note well, I am not asserting that that racism isn’t real, and that there aren’t racist individuals. Voddie Baucham doesn’t assert it either. In fact he repeatedly notes this for clarity sake.

    However, that’s a different animal from the boogie man of systemic racism. This is pushed so hard because to suggest that black people (or women, or other minorities) have any power over the results they achieve in life is to suggest that they have agency; also known as personal power.

    So we much ignore all of the cultural dysfunction and personal choices that my lead to an explanation with regard to disparate outcomes. We much instead steadfastly assert that disparate outcomes are all the evidence we need to demonstrate systemic racism.

    But don’t look at it too closely, though, Bike. If you do, you’ll find holes in that logic that a bus could drive through. So in order to keep non critical thinking people from looking at it too closely, they just yelling, screeching and beating their drums:

    “Hey! Look over here! See this? it’s systemic racism! No, don’t admit that your choices impacted your current situation. You’re awesome. It’s the fault of systemic racism!”

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  5. Bike Bubba says:

    Dear sister, well said, and I think that my part in this is to ask the “screeching crowd” precisely what they would change. Ask them–“show me what things in our society systematically discriminate against a group, and tell me precisely what you would do to fix it.”

    The sneaky, horrible mean part of this, of course, is that I would be forcing the advocates to actually do the hard work of demonstrating the truth of their hypothesis. Got a mile wide gap in your logic? I’ll be the one to help you see it. :^)

    Liked by 1 person

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