Friday Fave: A Quote Worth Considering

Joshua Gibbs of Circe Institute offers this kernel of wisdom which dovetails perfectly with my concluding thoughts on Neil Postman’s The Disappearance of Childhood. It’s always exciting when someone says what I tried to say, even if I wish I could have said it as well as they said it. From his recent post, Apart from Dogma, Inspiring Wonder is Reckless:

Children need room to play, but inspiring wonder without also teaching that some things aren’t up for debate is like loosing little children to explore, create, and discover on a busy interstate.

A rather astounding number of Christian high school graduates go on to abandon the faith in college. Is this for lack of wonder or lack of orthodoxy? Both, I suspect.

This quote is worth the price of admission, really, but click over and read the entire post. Those of us who have chosen the path of classical, religious education for our children need to give attention to what it is we’re ultimately trying to produce in our kids. Bonus quote from farther into the post:

Unhinged imaginations always work their way around to perversity.

I’m interested in your thoughts about the aims and methods of education. Share them!

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “Friday Fave: A Quote Worth Considering

  1. Bike Bubba says:

    Love it. I personally have noted that I spend a fair amount of time letting my kids know “this is the way things work, you can’t argue your way out of this.” Sad to say, sometimes the source of the error is youth group. One big example was when my church had a couple of kids nearly drown on a canoeing trip, people were saying “well, this could have happened to anyone.” I clarified that yes, this could have happened to anyone who didn’t wear life jackets and disregarded signs that the river was very high, but would be not nearly as risky to someone wearing a life jacket and paying attention to the river.

    Well, actually, I was a little more blunt, since we’d just come darned near to burying a couple of boys, and I felt being emphatic was appropriate. :^)

    Liked by 2 people

  2. smkoseki says:

    A rather astounding number of Christian high school graduates go on to abandon the faith in college. Is this for lack of wonder or lack of orthodoxy?

    Neither, I think. I think because it was never orthodoxy to begin with. Rather, cheap grace. Any intelligent kid would have reasons. The less intelligent can usually intuit BS when they see it.

    I’m interested in your thoughts about the aims and methods of education. Share them!

    Aim: to pass on authoritative Tradition, that is, one that sits outside of the teacher. Method: teach virtue, but use words sparingly.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Elspeth says:

    @ smkoseki:

    I agree that what a lot of people believe is orthodox doctrine is far from if. I also recognize that you would likely include me in that number, 😆

    Like

  4. smkoseki says:

    I also recognize that you would likely include me in that number

    I think you may misunderstand me. I merely note that orthodox Christian religion must be “outside” of myself. I don’t get to “decide” what orthodoxy is, I only can choose to conform myself to the unbroken Church. Or not. As St. Mathew warns: Even now the axe is laid to the root of the trees. Every tree therefore that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. Even rebels like Gibbs kinda get it: Unhinged imaginations always work their way around to perversity.

    Like

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.