Reading is easy. Writing is harder.

This blog is primarily centered around the love of reading and reviewing books. As such, it’s a slow traffic space. That’s fine with me as several book bloggers have noted that blogs generate the smallest amount of interest when they review books. Nevertheless, I am committed to the review format because I sincerely and truly want to encourage reading and expose books to people that they may not have considered.

However, that’s not all this was supposed to be about. I have been flirting with the idea of writing a book for several years. The topic is fresh, largely unexplored in depth, and quite possibly one of great interest. It may even be controversial, which would surprise no one who knows me well enough to have gotten my unvarnished views on the state of the world. Despite this clearly exalted view of my own brilliance and ability to come up with something “new”, I haven’t been able to get myself to start writing, and I am not quite sure why.

By way of encouragement, my beloved bought me a new computer this week. His confidence in my ability backed with concrete action toward helping me move forward is touching. I should be excited and ready to start typing away on my new laptop, but I’m stuck. And struck by the thought that, despite the ravings of my 1th grade gifted English teacher, those seeds which first germinated the hope that I might actually write something someone else wanted to read, the journey from germination to fruit is a long one.

No amount of confidence from my teacher, my husband, my friends or anyone else can prune for me the weeds of procrastination, eliminate the squash bugs of doubt, nor cure the blight of writer’s block which sends me back to the easy comfort of reading books and writing book reviews.

In other words, reading a book is easy. Writing one? That’s hard.

 

12 thoughts on “Reading is easy. Writing is harder.

  1. Major Styles says:

    “I have been flirting with the idea of writing a book for several years. The topic is fresh, largely unexplored in depth, and quite possibly one of great interest.”

    Go for it, El. You have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. hearthie says:

    Yes, it is. I’ve been completely dry for months on my book.
    My recommendation – just write the words. Edit later. Just let it flow and don’t worry about fabulous, that will come.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Elspeth says:

    “You have everything to gain and nothing to lose.”

    Thanks, Major. I know I am going to get going soon, because the thoughts are starting to crystalize a bit more. It is slightly frustrating the lack of balanced research or commentary out there. But of course, that’s what got my attention in the first place, so…

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Elspeth says:

    Write the words and edit later is exactly the plan I’m working with now, Hearth. Thanks!

    You know you’ll hear from me often enough when progress is being made.

    Like

  5. Elspeth says:

    Also Hearth (considering your dry spell), I think in both our cases, even though the subjects aren’t similar specifically, they are both topics where it is hard to express the depth and nuances involved. I think that’s precisely because there are no small number of people who are comfortable with comfort -of whatever variety- and how dare anyone suggest discomfort in favor of something more stable and beautiful?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. hearthie says:

    It’s *very* hard to express the depth and nuances. I am in a place where I want to drag the reader out and show them something and say, “this!” and … er… one can’t really DO that in words. Two books come out – one more practical and one more intense, and I want the latter, but I can’t make that birth – it has to come of its own.

    You’ve talked about the work you want to do and it needs doing and you’re the only one for it. Are you going to let the truth that needs to get out sit on the ground? Nope! Not you! You’re going to get it out there where it can be shared and become useful. I’m looking forward to lots of early reading and sounding-boarding, if you give me the privilege.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Robyn says:

    Hearth is right; type as you think AND DON’T EDIT OR EVEN CORRECT SPELLING! Also, talk less about what you are thinking about and let your thoughts land on the page/screen instead. There’s something to it, I’m not sure what yet.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Krysta says:

    I wish you the best as you get started on your book! Writing is undoubtedly hard, but also worth it, yes? πŸ™‚ I’m sure we’re all cheering you on!

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Elspeth says:

    type as you think AND DON’T EDIT OR EVEN CORRECT SPELLING!

    I’m bad at that.

    talk less about what you are thinking about and let your thoughts land on the page/screen instead.

    And even worse at that. I swear I must have talked my husband’s ear off for an hour today on the subject, lol..

    But I will try going forward to pour all of that out on the page. So thanks.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. magistratrium says:

    I agree with Hearthie. Don’t edit as you go. First drafts are always terrible. They’re supposed to be. I’m working on something now and I’m purposely trying to ignore my inner editor so that I can achieve the voice I want my writing to reflect. You can easily void your natural writing voice if you over-edit. You can also get stuck and never go anywhere.

    Your thoughts and opinions are valuable ones. I look forward to hearing more.

    Like

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