The Highest Education

I’m currently preparing to teach a relatively low-key, six-week course of short stories and readings to middle schoolers. To that end, I was perusing my collection of classic short stories.

As I searched my Kindle library, I noticed that I had highlighted large portions of a particular chapter in Booker T. Washington’s Character Building. The chapter is titled The Highest Education, and as I re-read the highlighted sections, I thought they were worth sharing here.

He starts by indicating how education is most commonly viewed:

We are very apt to get the idea that education means the memorizing of a number of dates, of being able to state when a certain battle took place, of being able to recall with accuracy this event or that event. We are likely to get the impression that education consists in being able to commit to memory a certain number of rules in grammar, a certain number of rules in arithmetic, and in being able to locate correctly on the earth’s surface this mountain or that river, and to name this lake and that gulf.

Now I do not mean to disparage the value of this kind of training, because among the things that education should do for us is to give us strong, orderly and well developed minds. I do not wish to have you get the idea that I undervalue or overlook the strengthening of the mind. If there is one person more than another who is to be pitied, it is the individual who is all heart and no head. You will see numbers of persons going through the world whose hearts are full of good things – running over with the wish to do something to make somebody better, or the desire to make somebody happier – but they have made the sad mistake of being absolutely without development of mind to go with this willingness of heart. We want development of mind and we want strengthening of the mind.

He continues by making clear why the above is important but incomplete:

But, after all, this kind of thing is not the end of education. What, then, do we mean by education? I would say that education is meant to give us an idea of truth. Whatever we get out of text books, whatever we get out of industry, whatever we get here and there from any sources, if we do not get the idea of truth at the end, we do not get education. I do not care how much you get out of history, or geography, or algebra, or literature, I do not care how much you have got out of all your text books:-unless you have got truth, you have failed in your purpose to be educated. Unless you get the idea of truth so pure that you cannot be false in anything, your education is a failure.

These were originally lectures which were later compiled into book form. Washinton ended this session by impressing upon his students that their aim should be finding the true and the beautiful -ultimately from God- in their educational pursuits:

Education is meant to make us appreciate the things that are beau-tiful in nature. A person is never educated until he is able to go into the swamps and woods and see something that is beautiful in the trees and shrubs there, is able to see something beautiful in the grass and flowers that surround him, is, in short, able to see something beautiful, elevat-ing and inspiring in everything that God has created. Not only should education enable us to see the beauty in these objects which God has put about us, but it is meant to influence us to bring beautiful objects about us. I hope that each one of you, after you graduate, will surround himself at home with what is beautiful, inspiring and elevating. I do not believe that any person is educated so long as he lives in a dirty, miserable shanty. I do not believe that any person is educated until he has learned to want to live in a clean room made attractive with pictures and books, and with such surroundings as are elevating.

In a word, I wish to say again, that education is meant to give us that culture, that refinement, that taste which will make us deal truthfully with our fellow men, and will make us see what is beautiful, elevating and inspiring in what God has created. I want you to bear in mind that your text books, with all their contents, are not an end, but a means to an end, a means to help us get the highest, the best, the purest and the most beautiful things out of life.

The entire chapter can be read here.

5 thoughts on “The Highest Education

  1. Major Styles says:

    Two of my favorite short stories are ones not commonly added to any anthology. “The Lake” by Ray Bradbury about a boy that watches a young girl drown; he then returns to the spot many years later as a grown man, contemplating the concepts of love and death.

    http://www.weylmann.com/The%20Lake.pdf

    And then “The Country of the Blind” by HG Wells, about a man in Peru that falls down a mountain, landing into the bottom of a valley. In that valley live a group of blind people that believe sight does not exist.

    http://www.thatmarcusfamily.org/philosophy/Amusements/Wells.pdf

    Liked by 1 person

  2. elspeth says:

    Looking forward to checking out those short stories, Major. the second one sounds particularly intriguing. Thanks for that.

    Booker T. Washington was a most profound and eloquent thinker/educator. I have joked on occasion that I am one of his “intellectual groupies”.

    He as well (along with Zora Neale Hurston) is a black Americans that I am drawn to particularly for the understanding that we cannot look to anyone to “repay” blacks for past injustices, expect to move forward while constantly looking backwards, nor can we reach our fullest potential without a measured view of all humanity and a firm resolution to refuse to buy into the language and thinking of inferiority.

    But I’m getting all off the main idea now. I think, however, that you especially will appreciate this bit from Washington in that same chapter:

    I have often said to you that one of the best things that education can do for an individual is to teach that individual to get hold of what he wants

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Robyn says:

    This …

    “…whatever we get here and there from any sources, if we do not get the idea of truth at the end, we do not get education.”

    This, in a nutshell, was the outcome all of the education to my kids. Because truth will always lead you to God.

    Liked by 1 person

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