Coming Attractions: Meet Generation Z

I ran across a book title which has piqued my curiosity. It’s called Meet Generation Z: Understanding and Reaching the New Post-Christian World. The Goodreads blurb alone stopped me short:

Move over Boomers, Xers, and Millennials; there’s a new generation–making up more than 25 percent of the US population–that represents a seismic cultural shift. Born approximately between 1993 and 2012, Generation Z is the first truly post-Christian generation, and they are poised to challenge every church to rethink its role in light of a rapidly changing culture.

From the award-winning author of The Rise of the Nones comes this enlightening introduction to the youngest generation. James Emery White explains who this generation is, how it came to be, and the impact it is likely to have on the nation and the faith. Then he reintroduces us to the ancient countercultural model of the early church, arguing that this is the model Christian leaders must adopt and adapt if we are to reach members of Generation Z with the gospel. He helps readers rethink evangelistic and apologetic methods, cultivate a culture of invitation, and communicate with this connected generation where they are.

Pastors, ministry leaders, youth workers, and parents will find this an essential and hopeful resource.

And all this time, I thought my kids born in the mid-90s were officially millennials! Seems I was wrong.

More than this however, is the fact that the differences and overlapping of generations has begun to fascinate me much more in recent years. We tend to assume that generations in families are distinct and easily identifiable, and that may be true now, but it wasn’t always the case.

I was 7 years old when I first became an aunt, so have nieces who are my comrades in 40-somethingness. Many of my nephews and nieces are fellow Gex Xers. That’s basically unheard of today with our delayed family formation and small family sizes, but I can remember being in elementary school with two girls who were the same age, but also niece and auntie.

Because of my unique experience which is only unique in the context of our current reality, I am always intrigued by the different generational labels, and this book by James Emery White is, I hope, an interesting peek at the differences between the current generation of young Christians and the approach to Christian outreach when I was a kid. We’ll see if there is a new, more effective way to share our faith.

When I finish it, I’ll offer my take on whether it’s as helpful a resource as the publisher asserts.

 

Friday Faves Potpourri

Consider this stream of consciousness, outlining a few things this past week that piqued my interest, made me think, or sparked joy.

Inspired by Sanne @ Adventures in Keeping House, with her blackberry jam, I’ll start by sharing the peach preserves that our daughter made and canned on Saturday. Peach season is winding down, but you can still get some good ones and they are still perfectly peachy right now. Last year, I posted a few pictures of our time picking peaches and the resulting peach cobbler. We enjoy peaches very much!

While our daughter did most of the work on the preserves, we all pitched in and offered assistance. My biggest contribution was peeling of the peaches, and the Sunday morning almond flour biscuits that were the canvas on which the preserves were able to shine during breakfast. We are big on staging our food photgraphs, in case it isn’t obvious:

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In addition to peach preserves last weekend, I had the immense pleasure of joining some fellow travelers on the homeschooling journey to read Shakespeare’s, Julius Caesar. It was a wonderful time to prepare in anticipation of our junior high and high school students reading it this fall.

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I don’t remember enjoying the play nearly as much when I was forced to read it in high school. It’s always better to read something when you’re better able to appreciate not only the language, but the nuances and tone of the work. I strongly suggest considering a re-read of the books you think you hated because you were forced to read them in high school.

Next, some thoughts about fast fashion versus clothing made with real fabrics. I was recently looking for a casual, white cotton button downshirt for my husband, and as usual, I was looking for a deal. However, I ran across a really luxurious feeling linen shirt, and although it cost a bit more than I had originally wanted to spend, I bought it anyway.

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My friend Hearthie writes a lot about real versus counterfeit and in that moment I realized how often we miss opportunities to buy the thing that will hold it’s value, shape, and quality over time for the sake of a few bucks. And I was kind of proud of myself.

A note about my increasing enjoyment of sprinting, something I never imagined I could ever enjoy. At least, not since I was about 12 years old. When my husband first started challenging me  four weeks ago to forgo the long jogs in favor of HIIT training composed of brisk walks interspersed with sprints of about 100 yards, I gave him 100 excuses for why I couldn’t do it. Now? I love it, especially noting how much farther I can last and how much shorter my recovery time is after each sprint.

Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks?

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Lastly, I am almost ready to review the book I have enjoyed most year to date, How to Be Unlucky: Reflections on the Pursuit of Virtue, by Joshua Gibbs. At about 3/4 of the way through my second reading, I’ve finally decided not to break this review up into a post of analysis as I go. There’s just too much to absorb and I wouldn’t begin to know what to focus on and how to highlight the ideas that I was most arrested by. There are just too many. I am certain I’ve said this before, but despite our very different religious backgrounds, this lifelong Protestant has found an ideological and spiritual kindred spirit in the Orthodox Joshua Gibbs.

I’ll have a proper review up by the end of the month.

What are some things that you are enjoying or have enjoyed recently?

 

 

 

Back to homeschool (or whatever this is) has arrived.

After attending an orientation last night and rush ordering a few textbooks with expedited shipping, it is official. Summer may not end formally until September 21st (some consider Labor Day summer’s official end), but symbolically, our summer is over. School’s beginning signals a massive shift from the way we’ve been doing things the past four months.

As homeschoolers -technically speaking- our summer starts in mid-May and ends in mid-August, hence the four months of down time. Most of the ancillary schools which support homeschooling families call it quits fairly early compared to traditional school structure. At home, we continue to work diligently into June, but by then we’re only operating at maintenance levels, tying up the academic loose ends of the recently completed school year.

As school starts, my reading queue shifts accordingly. In addition to reading whatever I happen to be interested in at a given moment, I also read whatever my kids have been assigned by their literature teachers. This semester’s list offers me lots of opportunity to revisit old friends that I haven’t read in decades. Titles such as Animal Farm and The Scarlet Pimpernel are on this year’s list, among others. I’m looking forward to seeing these books through my kids’ eyes.

After the orientation and meet and greet so reminiscent of the days when our older kids went through the government school system, I was struck by how the reality of homeschooling (at least how we do it) is so different from the perception most people have when I answer their queries with, “They’re homeschooled”.

We do have friends who have been homeschooling for a quarter century or more and are still at it. That’s one of the great things about homeschooling when you have a large family; so many other people have large families that not only are you not unusual, your family may even be small by comparison to many. Our five kids is no big deal. But I digress.

The point, which I was so easily distracted from, is that homeschooling in 2019 is very different from what homeschooling was in 1994, which was when several of my homeschooling friends started out. The vast number of co-ops, support networks, ancillary schools and opportunities to homeschool in community were far fewer and much farther between than they are today. Those ladies were doing almost all of the heavy lifting on their own, and from what I can tell, most have done an incredible job of it.

Even with all the publicity, resources, and information available related to homeschooling, I still get the same kinds of questions; even from people to whom I’ve answered them several times!

  • Who are you accountable to for your curriculum?
  • How do you know they’ve passed to the next grade?
  • The state allows you to do that?
  • And lastly…

Can you guess, dear reader, what the final and most often posed question is when we mention homeschooling?

I bet you’ll have no trouble coming up with the answer.

All of this left me wondering if homeschooling is even an appropriate description of what many of us are doing now. While our kids’ education is parent directed, we’re not the only teachers, and our kids aren’t at home with us all day, every day. One critical distinction is that what we delegate in time as we outsource some of the instruction, we pay for in treasure, because it’s not cheap, and no one is giving our kids their books as they would in the government school system.

So… if our kids do some of their learning at home, some of it in school, and some of it independently, what would be the proper term for such an education? I for one, believe it’s far more sane and reality-based than the traditional model. A model, I might add, which is only providing optimal results for the children whose family have the time or treasure to properly supplement with home learning and extracurricular support, which sounds eerily like what we’re doing.

We’ve chosen religious rather than secular instruction, but that’s the major difference.

A la carte education is here to stay, unless and until someone decides that is too harmful to the political status quo. I am of the opinion that proper acknowledgment of the a la carte educational model would be a very good thing.

For now, we’re homeschoolers.

The Old Man and the Sea

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The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway, published in 1952. 112 pages.

This weekend, I decided to read this short novel from Hemingway for a couple of reasons. The first is his poetic way of describing natural beauty, and the second is because this is a very short book, and I was guaranteed to finish it off in less than two days. It is a very satisfying man vs. nature novella.

Santiago is an old fisherman, once successful, who has experienced a long run of bad luck on the seas. For a time, the young boy Manolin was his apprentice fisherman, and caretaker on and off the boat. However, since Santiago has gone for so long without catching any fish, his parents forbid him from fishing with him any longer. They send him to apprentice with more successful fishermen.

Manolin obeys his parents, but his heart is still with old Santiago, and he checks in on the solitary fisherman every morning and every night. He makes sure that he eats, gets him his morning coffee, and they talk baseball. Both love Joe Dimaggio.

One morning Santiago heads out early, determined that it will be the day his luck turns around. He loads his skiff and sails out farther than he normally would, following the current and the birds overhead who seem to indicate a place where he’ll find a large school of fish.

The thing I love about this book, despite having zero experience with sailing, is the way the sea is almost a character all its own. This was something I noticed when reading The Lion’s Paw and Captains Courageous as well. Here, Hemingway contrasts the way older fishermen like Santiago and younger fishermen characterize the sea:

He [Santiago] always thought of the sea as la mar, which is what people call her in Spanish when they love her. Sometimes those who love her say bad things about of her but they are always said as though she were a woman. Some of the younger fishermen, those who used buoys as floats for their lines and had motorboats, bought when the shark livers had brought much money, spoke of her as el mar, which is masculine. They spoke of her as a contestant or a place or even an enemy. But the old man always thought of her as feminine and as something that gave or withheld great favours, and if she did wild or wicked things it was because she could not help them. The moon affects her as it does a woman, he thought. p.29-30

Leaving aside the political correctness or lack thereof in Hemingway’s description, it’s a poetically beautiful description of the sea which gives the reader a vivid picture of how much the old man loves her.

On the day when he goes far out to sea, his luck does indeed turn. He hooks a gigantic marlin, so large that it pulls him farther and farther out to sea. He holds on to marlin, suffering intense pain, hunger, and discomfort for two days. In the end…

You’ll just have to read it, which you can do for free right here. It’s so short that the only thing left is the ending, and I don’t want to spoil it for you!

4 out of 5 stars.

 

 

Friday Faves: Articles of the Week

I’m thinking Friday Faves might be a regular installment, so if there is any topic you think might be fun to include, suggest it as a possible Friday Fave post. It doesn’t have to be reading or education related. It can include any number of things that go on in the life between the reading.

Here are a few of the posts I’ve read over the past week that have stuck with me in one way or another. Most are about reading and educaton issues, but not all, and that’s a requirement for the list. For this week, they’re among my faves.

  • Thinkspot and the Rise of Long-Tail Social Media: When Cal Newport first wrote about long-tail social media, I had to look it up. It was something I’d never heard before, although I realize that I have been a part of things like it before. The brain-child of Jordan Peterson, Thinkspot is offering a different way. It sounds a lot better as an option for discussing common interests than Twitter. I really dislike Twitter. Anything that can be used to destroy someone’s life because of what they believe needs to be usurped and tossed for a better alternative. Let’s hope long-tail social media catches on if we’re going to have social media at all.
  • The Mis-Education at Garvey’s Ghost: As usual, Sondjata cuts through the bull surrounding the achievement gap and asks the hard questions. I’m not always 100% in agreement with him about things, but I always appreciate his intellectual honesty, and I do agree with him on a great many issues.
  • Is Classical Education Just a Fad? Joshua Gibbs asks what we are to make of the recent surge in schools dedicated to the classical education model. I for one don’t think it’s a fad because it stands in stark contrast to current educational dogma and norms, but we’ll see. Gibbs offers his take in this piece.
  • This is Why Your Library Doesn’t Own the E-book You Want: Krysta at Pages Unbound discussses the tug of war between local libraries and major publishing companies which are steadily increasing the prices of electronic book offerings. It’s an interesting conversation; at least to those of us who are invested in the library system.
  • Impure Motives of Purity Culture Critics: Rod Dreher examines the harshness with which many Christians condemn so-called purity culture, and reaches a conclusion that I agree with. There are legitimate issues to be had with formulaic approaches to the faith which ignore the fact that a good many people in the current culture have no framework in which to put chastity to begin with. But a lot of Christians condemn all attempts to encourage modesty and chastity on order to excuse their own behavior.

Those are a few of the interesting links I’ve read over the past week. I’ll be moving all of these posts over to the links worth a look page where there are other interesting linked articles.

Have a great weekend!

Cookbooks and Surviving the Low-Carb Life

We are a house divided; nutritionally speaking. Two of us readily resist the pull of grains and carbs, while the rest of us eat what they like.

A while back I reviewed the book Keto Clarity after a friend asked my thoughts about it. We had a robust discussion here about the pluses and minuses of that lifestyle. At the end of the day, I rejected the plan for two reasons. The first is that I didn’t think I could sustain it long term, and the second is that I really enjoy eating fruit. Fruit is the thing that satisfies my desire for a little something sweet, and there’s very little margin in the keto life for regular servings of fruits, or many vegetables that I love, such as carrots.

Along the way to that conclusion, however, I ran across a lot of really great recipes in ketogenic cookbooks. These are helpful, for while I am not interested in living the keto life, I am fully committed to a lifestyle that restricts starchy, carbohydrate laden foods.

Among the keto cookbooks I most enjoyed were the wonderful Mark Sisson’s Keto Reset Diet Cookbook, as well as Dirty, Lazy, Keto. Both of these have great recipes, but most of my cooking and eating is more aligned with The Whole30 approach to nutrition than the keto approach. One thing from the ketogenic approach that I have really appreciated are the bread recipes. I have not embraced the rejection of bread the way many people seem to be able to do.

Last night’s dinner was a big salad topped with seared ahi tuna slices. Given that everyone in our house had been out for a run yesterday morning (and I’d done some weight training later in the day), I knew that the salad alone would be little light after a long, hard day. So I decided to make dinner rols to serve on the side and add a little heft.

For those who preferred the traditional bread option, there were yeast rolls:

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For those of us who didn’t want the yeast rolls (I wanted them but they are antithetical to my fitness goals), there were these keto rolls from a recipe I found at Kerbie’s Cravings:

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So everyone was able to enjoy a roll with their salads, and the inspiration for that came from my time perusing ketogenic cookbooks. One thing I have learned is that not all keto breads ar ecreated equal. Many taste very eggy, which I don’t like, but these rolls have a wonderful texture and mouth feel.

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I don’t often review cookbooks, and I don’t often use them despite having many on our bookshelves. However, switching from the standard American diet was a revelatory transition, as I’d never really considered how nutritionally sparse our diet had been until I began to give it more scrutiny about 8 years ago. Reading cookbooks during that time helped to spark my culinary creativity.

What role do cookbooks play in your cooking and eating life? None? Some? A lot?

 

 

Audiobooks: Is it reading?

Recently my husband, who is not much for old school paper reading of any kind, listened to the book I Am Legend via Audible. As he enlightened me on all the differences between the book and the movie, I thought I might be inclined to listen to it myself. Sci-fi horror isn’t really my thing, so I probably won’t listen to it, but even if I was interested in it, I’d check out a hard copy of the book from the library.

I have a friend who recently listened to the book Johnny Tremain after reading my review, and she told me all about the great audio reading app available through our library system. As much as I utilize our library, I’d never even considered whether they offered an audio book app. It’s my least preferred way to read.

I’ve begun listening to several audiobooks in the past, and am rarely able to finish one because I find my mind wandering off to other things. When I am able to listen to a book, and occasionally I am, it’s always in my car. In the car, I can listen attentively to an audiobook. In the house, I can listen to shorter things like podcasts, sermons, and of course, music. Earlier this year, we got a car which connects to the bluetooth on my phone, so who knows? There will probably be a lot more audiobooks in my future.

My husband, conversely, listens to just about everything. The exception is the Bible, which he says he gets more from actually seeing the words, but he considers audio books a legitimate reading activity. At the end of the day, whether you listened to a story, flipped its pages, or read it on a screen, you still took in the content.

I started listening to The Brothers Karamazov on Librivox a couple of months ago, and I was really enjoying it, but I couldn’t go the distance. I’ll be checking it out from the library when I finish my current book. Or perhaps I’ll try to pick up the story where I left off via audio book. We’ll see.

This article at Time Magazine offers expert opinion on whether audiobooks are as good for your brain as reading. Interesting, how they titled it…

What say you? Is listening to an audiobook the same as reading the words on a page or screen?

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